Best Guide That Shows You How To Make An Espresso

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Despite what many so-called coffee experts might tell you are making espresso is no more complicated than making a loaf of bread.

All you need to do is follow a good recipe and have some good coffee beans.

There is some fine-tuning to do afterward, as always. However, that’s the fun part because you’ll be making it suit your own taste. Once you’ve made a few good ones it will all be plain sailing after that.

The espresso you end up with will depend on some things, the water temperature, the dose of dry coffee, the time it takes the machine to make the shot, and the amount of espresso that you’re making.

There is some fine-tuning to do afterward, as always. However, that’s the fun part because you’ll be making it suit your own taste.

Once you’ve made a few good ones it will all be plain sailing after that.The espresso you end up with will depend on some things. The water temperature, the dose of dry coffee, the time it takes the machine to make the shot, and the amount of espresso that you’re making.

Typically we like to set our machine between 90c and 95c however; some domestic machines won’t be able to hold that as well as the big commercial coffee machines.

Step 1 – Choosing the right Coffee

What you need is really good freshly ground coffee beans. It doesn’t have to be a dark roast, but it needs to be packed full of flavor and it needs to be very finely ground.

If you don’t know already. Dark roasts tend to be more complex with chocolate and caramel undertones, while lighter roasts are more fruity.

At Nude Coffee, we always say that the best cups of coffee come between 10 and 15 days after roasting.

That’s something to look out for when you’re buying your next batch of coffee beans!

A note for those of you who are buying coffee beans for grinding at home. A course grind will produce a very weak coffee.

The course grind will give you a watery looking shot with little or no crema (crema is the golden/brown foam that covers a freshly brewed espresso – it’s typically a sign of a good coffee).

This will take some practice to get right because it’s not easy. On the other hand, you can also grind it too fine.

If you do, you’ll produce a harsh, bitter coffee that is over extracted. What you’ve got to get your head around is the process involved in making coffee this way – basically, water is forced through the coffee grinds by the machine.

If it’s too fine it will take too long and if it’s too course, it won’t take long enough.

Once you’ve done this a few times, you’ll be able to tell just by looking at the grind what type of coffee it’s going to make but at the start, there is going to be a degree of trial and error involved.

For a normal 30ml double espresso, we would recommend using about 18 grams of dry ground coffee beans.

This is slightly more than usual for this type of shot which would normally have anywhere between 12 grams and 15 grams (for a traditional double espresso).

Once, you’ve got the machine going it should take about 30 seconds to extract. That’s 30 seconds between switching the water on and then off again.

Step 2 – Extraction

The extraction (sometimes known as the pour) should take between 25 and 30 seconds.

However, as a rule of thumb if it takes less then, this time, say 15 seconds then you know your beans are too course, and you’ll end up with a weak, watery looking coffee that won’t taste very nice.

Obviously, if it takes longer than 30 seconds then you know you’ve been a bit over keen with the grinder!

Tips & Advice

Make sure the espresso machine is clean

If you have any oily residue it can taint the taste of your espresso!

The hot water will always find the easiest way through the ground coffee beans.

That means if your grind isn’t consistent then you won’t get a good end product.

A little bit of time at the start is worth it in the end.Try our Espresso blend coffee beans; we know you’ll love them.